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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I need some sort of suspension upgrade for my 2014 F6C, at least heavier springs, and from what I have seen about the damper rod situation, I should probably replace that as well. Undecided on the back spring and shock, but I should probably get at least the spring.

For reference I weigh 360lbs, my wife is 160lbs, I have molded, and I assume heavy, 45L total Corbin bags, and a 60L bag. I have bottomed out the front several times just driving around town just by myself without the wife or bags.

Anyone have any first hand experience on what suspension stuff is cross compatible with the Goldwing and Valk? Some places seem to think the Goldwing, F6B, and Valk are compatible suspension wise, some places list the F6B and Goldwing separately, and I have yet to find a place that actually lists the Valk separately for suspension stuff. It seems like there must be some differences as the Valk doesn't have an anti dive valve, and I have heard the whole triple tree and fork is a bit floppy on the Goldwing, but mine seems rock solid on the Valk.

Any thoughts on a good suspension that is less expensive than the Traxxion kit? I am not completely ruling it out, but I would prefer to not spend that much. So far I have been looking at Progressive, Rach Tech, and Traxxion, but I am open to other suggestions.

$356 Progressive Suspension 31-2511 Front Monotube Fork Cartridge Kit https://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Suspension-31-2511-Monotube-Cartridge/dp/B0068EOE3Q - Seems easy and the cheaper option.

Race Tech: Multiple prices, multiple options, Gold valve kit front ($300), Gold valve rear shock conversion ($110), and probably heavier front ($150) and rear springs ($180) .

Race Tech spring recommendation, I figure since the Valk weighs about 150lbs less than the Goldwing, 150lbs less on the rider calc should be close:
Stock Front Spring Rate Front: 0.75 kg/mm (stock) (Traxxion says they are progressive and start at .73 and go to 1.6)
Recommended Front Spring Rate for Goldwing with 360lb rider: 1.22 kg/mm (Use closest available)
Recommended Front Spring Rate for Goldwing with 210lb rider: 0.97 kg/mm (Use closest available)

Stock Spring Rate Rear: 16.5 kg/mm (stock)
Recommended Spring Rate for Goldwing with 360lb rider: 26.73 kg/mm (Use closest available)
Recommended Spring Rate for Goldwing with 210lb rider: 22.50 kg/mm (Use closest available)

Traxxion:
AK-20 Axxion Cartridge Kit w/ Spring and Fork Caps1249.95
Labor to Remove/Install Forks on the Bike150.00
Labor to Service Forks and Install AK-20 Kit300.00
OEM Fork Seals w/ Dust Seals49.95
OEM Inner Fork Bushings29.90
Traxxion Fork Brace w/ Bug Guards349.95
All Balls Steering Head Bearings44.95
Labor to install Bearings while forks are off250.00
Traxxion GL1800 Rear Shock799.95
Labor to Remove/Replace Shock350.00
Subtotal3,574.65
Full Mony Discount-274.70
Fully Monty Price3,299.95


A lot to cover there, I am thinking the Progressive fronts and the Race Tech rear spring with the stock rear shock at the minimum for about $506+ tax, and whatever seals and bearings need to be replaced. Race Tech in the middle with $710 for a DIY front and rear shock fix plus springs, which seems good, but the most possible to mess up. And the Full Monty Traxxion for $3,300+ however much their authorized installer marks it up, plus a 4 and a half hour drive to their nearest authorized installer.

So what are your guys thoughts?
 

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So what are your guys thoughts?
The rear suspension has some adjustability. I would try cranking up the preload first before putting any time or money into it. Of course, I only weight 215 pounds and didn't have any issues when fully loaded this past summer.

P. 77 of Valkyrie Owner's Manual
Adjusting the Rear Suspension Spring Preload

You can adjust the spring preload by the adjuster knob to suit the load or the road surface.

1. Remove the left side cover. 2 P. 54
2. Turn the adjuster knob clockwise to increase spring preload (hard), or turn counterclockwise to decrease spring preload (soft). The standard position is 18 clicks from the minimum setting.

NOTICE
Do not turn the adjuster beyond its limits.
NOTICE The rear shock absorber damper unit contains high pressure nitrogen gas. Do not attempt to disassemble, service, or improperly dispose of the damper. See your dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rear suspension has some adjustability. I would try cranking up the preload first before putting any time or money into it. Of course, I only weight 215 pounds and didn't have any issues when fully loaded this past summer.

P. 77 of Valkyrie Owner's Manual
Adjusting the Rear Suspension Spring Preload

You can adjust the spring preload by the adjuster knob to suit the load or the road surface.

1. Remove the left side cover. 2 P. 54
2. Turn the adjuster knob clockwise to increase spring preload (hard), or turn counterclockwise to decrease spring preload (soft). The standard position is 18 clicks from the minimum setting.

NOTICE
Do not turn the adjuster beyond its limits.
NOTICE The rear shock absorber damper unit contains high pressure nitrogen gas. Do not attempt to disassemble, service, or improperly dispose of the damper. See your dealer.
Sure but that is just preload on the springs and just for the rear, that doesn't effect spring rate or anything, you are just increasing how much weight it requires to start moving the spring, the amount to bottom it out stays the same.

Also, you have that adjustment backwards, as I said here:

I have bottomed out the front several times just driving around town just by myself without the wife or bags.
If I am currently bottoming out the front, increasing preload in the rear will make that worse. Because now the rear suspension will be less responsive going over bumps, shuttling a greater amount of work to the end with the suspension that is responding, the front, and making it bottom out harder. No bueno.

If I really wanted to bandaid my current front bottoming out issue without actually fixing it, I could back off the rear preload until the front and rear were sharing the work as equally as possible and hope that was enough make it so neither end bottomed out on a bump, but both came close.

Regardless, what I really need is significantly stiffer springs in the front at the VERY least. Also one of the front forks has a damper rod from the factory, which inherently causes issues with fast suspension travel and should be replaced with something else if I want my front suspension to be able to handle larger bumps without locking up.

If you have never seen it I HIGHLY recommend watching the "Suspension for Mortals" series by Max from Traxxion Dynamics, in total it is a few hours long, but VERY much worth it. The whole series can be found on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPWgR0JlgOw2G9QM43jPL4wuDViMXzwn3
 

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Just a Head's up,

According to Honda, the maximum carrying capacity of the '14-15 Honda Valkyrie is 370lbs (including rider, passenger, all luggage & accessories)
This is on Page 121 in the owner's manual.
Likely, this is why the bike is bottoming out on you so easily.
I don't know what exactly is limiting the Valk to that max weight, and if upgrading its suspension components will help it (higher rate springs should keep it from bottoming out for sure)

Tazmool
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 2014 full Golding manual on page 50 states the max capacity is 410lbs. Since they have the same frame and the Goldwing weighs 150lbs more, I would think the Valkyrie would be capable of holding around 570lbs instead of 370 if it had the same springs as the Goldwing.

What is funny is from everything I have read and the suspension experts I have talked to, the Valkyrie does have the same springs as a full Goldwing.

Makes me wonder if they are just making up those numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But anyway, no opinion on companies or differences? Goldwings seem to be well known to be undersprung, I am surprised more people here have not done something to fix that.
 

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Making up numbers!?!? No, say it isn't so! If you haven't already, try the Goldwing forums for this. I think you'll find more riders who've been in your situation and had to modify their bikes, which are far easier to apply aftermarket parts to than our F6Cs, but might show you new possibilities. I thought the same thing Tazmool did when you mentioned your weight specs. Hey! Have you looked into Boss Hosses? You might not need the nitrous then, and you'll still have comfort! I'm not jibing you. I've been on them and they may offer what you're looking for. I'm guessing you've already looked, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Right now I am still researching for the suspension stuff, but basically everything I am reading for the normal 2001-2017 Goldwing says it is massively undersprung and under damped and stiffening up the springs makes it ride much smoother, handle tremendously better, and brake better, even with a normal weight rider.

If that is also the case with our bikes, I would think this was something we would all want to know.

The normal Goldwing also uses a cartridge damper in one front fork, and a damper rod in the other front fork with the anti dive valve. From everything I am reading, damper rods dont do well with fast suspension travel scenarios and actually can cause suspension lock up. In fact I am not 100% sure if the bottoming out sensation I am getting is from the front springs bottoming out, or if it is from the damper rod reaching max flow and basically locking up.

The problem I am having right now is I am seeing lots of places that dont list the Valkyrie at all or know what it has, some places say the Valkyrie has the exact same setup as the normal Goldwing, which isnt exactly true as the Valkyrie doesnt have an anti dive valve, some places saying the setup is different, but they dont know how, and a few misc odd reports, like one post on this forum where a user replaced the leg that has the ADV and damper rod on the Goldwing, and on the Valkyrie it was just a "Pogo stick" and had no type of damping whatsoever.

Obviously this info could be of significant use to many people here, not just myself.
 

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I'm curious about suspension compatibility between the models and years of the GL1800 line, and have looked into the rear suspenion components in the past as well as the front.

Just to double check I compared the 2007 Goldwing, 2014 Goldwing F6B and 2014 Goldwing F6C Valkyrie.
Comparing part diagrams and part numbers (OEM) on www.BikeBandit.com

The 2007 Goldwing and 2014 F6B have virtually the same front internal fork suspension components, same part numbers (at least on the parts I checked, damper rod assemblies, springs etc etc)
Unfortunately, the Valkyrie part numbers and even part counts/assemblies do not match either of the other bikes I compared it against.

Rear suspension is very similar between the F6B and F6C, however the regular goldwing has some significant changes.
I think a F6B shock may fit the Valkyrie, perhaps the remote preload hose for the hydraulic preload adjuster is different length, possibly different rate sping. The Goldwing tourer may be different enough due to more features of the goldwing (auto rear preload adjuster or something? ) and the goldwing being much heavier in the rear than the F6B and Valkyrie.

I think a possible course of action would be to find higher rate front fork springs for the Valkyrie (to get the correct fork sag numbers) and maybe go to a heavier fork oil to accomodate for the heavier springs (otherwise damping may be too light for the new springs)

It appears all 3 (F6C, F6B, Goldwing) have the entire damping assembly in just one fork leg, other side is just spring and followers.

Rear suspension wise, it may be possible to use a higher rated spring and stick with the stock shock, or maybe try a F6B rear shock with a heavier spring. Again this would be experimental.

I don't think you can direct swap aftermarket components from the regular Goldwing onto the Valkyrie, especially not the front. Maybe F6B rear shock and parts onto the Valkyrie.

If someone makes a kit for the Valkyrie specifically, go with that.
Otherwise you are developing your own kit.

Tazmool
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I'm curious about suspension compatibility between the models and years of the GL1800 line, and have looked into the rear suspenion components in the past as well as the front.

Just to double check I compared the 2007 Goldwing, 2014 Goldwing F6B and 2014 Goldwing F6C Valkyrie.
Comparing part diagrams and part numbers (OEM) on www.BikeBandit.com

The 2007 Goldwing and 2014 F6B have virtually the same front internal fork suspension components, same part numbers (at least on the parts I checked, damper rod assemblies, springs etc etc)
Unfortunately, the Valkyrie part numbers and even part counts/assemblies do not match either of the other bikes I compared it against.

Rear suspension is very similar between the F6B and F6C, however the regular goldwing has some significant changes.
I think a F6B shock may fit the Valkyrie, perhaps the remote preload hose for the hydraulic preload adjuster is different length, possibly different rate sping. The Goldwing tourer may be different enough due to more features of the goldwing (auto rear preload adjuster or something? ) and the goldwing being much heavier in the rear than the F6B and Valkyrie.

I think a possible course of action would be to find higher rate front fork springs for the Valkyrie (to get the correct fork sag numbers) and maybe go to a heavier fork oil to accomodate for the heavier springs (otherwise damping may be too light for the new springs)

It appears all 3 (F6C, F6B, Goldwing) have the entire damping assembly in just one fork leg, other side is just spring and followers.

Rear suspension wise, it may be possible to use a higher rated spring and stick with the stock shock, or maybe try a F6B rear shock with a heavier spring. Again this would be experimental.

I don't think you can direct swap aftermarket components from the regular Goldwing onto the Valkyrie, especially not the front. Maybe F6B rear shock and parts onto the Valkyrie.

If someone makes a kit for the Valkyrie specifically, go with that.
Otherwise you are developing your own kit.

Tazmool
Good idea on the looking up the part numbers, here is what I compared for the front suspension:

2014 Valkyrie: https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2014-honda-gold-wing-valkyrie-gl1800c/o/m156350#sch846770
02 Spring Both - SPRING, FR. FORK 51401-MJR-671
25 Damper Rod L - PIPE, SEAT 51540-MJR-671
11 Damper Cartridge R - DAMPER, FR. 51430-MJR-671

2014 F6B: https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2014-honda-gold-wing-f6b-gl1800b/o/m155459#sch846608
06 Spring Both - SPRING, FR. FORK 51401-MCA-A81
34 Damper Rod L - PIPE, SEAT 51540-MCA-003
20 Damper Cartridge R - DAMPER, FR. 51430-MCA-013
33 Anti Dive Valve - CASE, PLUNGER 51530-MJG-671

2014 Goldwing GL18007AC (no image): https://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2014-honda-gold-wing-gl18007ac/o/m163961#sch1117351
02 Spring Both - SPRING, FR. FORK 51401-MCA-A81
25 Damper Rod L - PIPE, SEAT 51540-MCA-003
11 Damper Cartridge R - DAMPER, FR. 51430-MCA-013
33 Anti Dive Valve - CASE, PLUNGER 51530-MCA-A61 and also CASE, PLUNGER 51530-MJG-671

I measured the fork tubes and they are 45mm, same as the normal Goldwing and F6B, not sure about length. I assume a lot of the differences between the F6B/Goldwing and the Valkyrie are the fact that the first two have brake activated Anti Dive Valves and the Valkyrie does not, which seems to be a good thing, as everything I have read about the ADV is that you should disable it ASAP. I am sure there are also some differences related to the front fender/brake cover attachment points, as those are different too. Not sure about the length of the forks.

I was wrong about no one offering a kit for the Valkyrie, Traxxion does: AK-20 Axxion Cartridge Kit (AK20H-Valkyrie-1) - Traxxion Dynamics That is just more than I really WANT to pay, especially as the full install out the door looks more like $3200-$4000 depending on authorized installer markup, and it HAS to be done by an authorized installer.

I am tempted to just pick this up for $140 so I can disassemble both sets, off a goldwing and a valkyrie, and lay them all out next to each other to see the actual differences: Honda 01 02 03 04 05 GL1800 GL Goldwing 1800 OEM Front Forks Suspension Bent | eBay

I emailed Progressive with a couple questions, particularly about rider weight vs spring rate, if they were rebuildable, and if so how much that costs and if they are user rebuildable. That being said I did decide to go ahead and buy the $356 Progressive Suspension 31-2511 from Amazon, as that was the cheapest I was seeing them, and that seller was down to their last one. These are about the cheapest option which is nice, but they mostly interest me because they are well reviewed and appear to be almost plug and play, not really any setup or anything special, or anything outside what I can do in my garage for the install.

The interesting part of this is that they no longer use the fork oil as part of the damping system as far as I can tell, they just seem to use it for the ADV system, which the Valk doesnt have, and lubrication, so I would imagine if the monotube shocks hold up well, maintenance intervals should be reduced.

Hopefully this kit fits in the Valkyrie. I will keep you guys updated.

This is their install video:

Wish me luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I thought the same thing Tazmool did when you mentioned your weight specs.
Yea, I am just a big guy, it would be nice if I only weighed 215 like Farther, but as I was 210 by the end of the 6th grade, so 215 is not going to be happening again. Smallest I ever got as an adult was in my mid 20s, straight protein for a couple years with NO carbs, and very little fat, then cutting that down to less than 500 calories a day worth the protein for about 8 months. I managed to get down to 238 but only by loosing a ton of muscle and looked like a refugee victim, as soon as I started eating about 1200 calories a day worth the chicken I was back up to 280 within a couple weeks. Not going to be doing that ever again. Now that I am over 40 I just try to eat a very clean healthy diet and work out when I can and weigh 360, not much to be done about it.

Hey! Have you looked into Boss Hosses? You might not need the nitrous then, and you'll still have comfort! I'm not jibing you. I've been on them and they may offer what you're looking for. I'm guessing you've already looked, though.
I have seen those bikes, not interested in a trike, which it seems like most of them are. For the cruisers I have not ridden one but I somehow doubt they have the same comfort, handing, braking, reliability, and fuel economy ability as the Valk. Plus, I REALLY like that I don't have to worry about burning myself on this bike's exhaust or hot engine case. The price on those things when they are in good shape is pretty insane too.

I do honestly love my Valk, and while I do have to make some changes for it to work optimally for me, the same could be said of any bike for me. Honestly at this point, unless something wildly unexpected happens, I plan to keep it for the next 10 years or so, and at that point I imagine anything new I might be considering will likely be electric.
 

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Yea, I am just a big guy, it would be nice if I only weighed 215 like Farther, but as I was 210 by the end of the 6th grade, so 215 is not going to be happening again. Smallest I ever got as an adult was in my mid 20s, straight protein for a couple years with NO carbs, and very little fat, then cutting that down to less than 500 calories a day worth the protein for about 8 months. I managed to get down to 238 but only by loosing a ton of muscle and looked like a refugee victim, as soon as I started eating about 1200 calories a day worth the chicken I was back up to 280 within a couple weeks. Not going to be doing that ever again. Now that I am over 40 I just try to eat a very clean healthy diet and work out when I can and weigh 360, not much to be done about it.
I have a degree in Biomechanics and Physiology from the University of Iowa. As a swimming coach for over ten years and a Martial Arts instructor and competitor for over thirty years, I was also very interested in the study of nutrition. Weight/height is often a very poor measurement of overall good body health, which is one of the reasons that the Body Mass Index and other standards have come into being, even though they have their own issues in trying to generalize standards. The healthy range of body fat for most men has been typically defined as around 8-19%, while the healthy range for women is closer to 21-33%. Notice my italicizing "healthy". And every single person can be an exception. When in my forties (I quit competing at 42, as I noticed that injuries were starting to heal more slowly by that age) my body fat percentage was below 6%, I weighed in at 220 and am only 5' 11''. Here's my point: if enjoying physical extremes and challenges are important to you, as well as your over-all health, learn to listen to your own body and build on your own experiences. You are the expert on you. How many people your size, who are giving health advice to others, have actually experienced a lifetime of being bigger than the average bear their entire lives? They haven't walked even one mile in your shoes, (because they are too big for them).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What is funny is I am actually not that tall, I just have a big build. I think I was about 340 in my profile pic, so I am greyer, but that is pretty much what I look like now. The bike size/weight thing is annoying, but honestly with enough adjusting several bikes couple probably work for me. The worst part of this sport or hobby or whatever you want to call it is finding the dang gear!

When I took my riding course I literally bought the biggest helmet I could find on the internet, which was an HJC i10 5XL helmet, and I had to remove all the padding to get it to fit over my ears even pulling it apart as hard as I could to make it through my riding course. Since then I have purchased a HJC i90 modular helmet, and that one MOSTLY fits as long as I remove half the padding, but I keep breaking the latches because apparently my face is pushing the sides out too far and stressing them.

Still have not found decent riding boots that are wide enough for my feet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Also forgot to mention about this:

It appears all 3 (F6C, F6B, Goldwing) have the entire damping assembly in just one fork leg, other side is just spring and followers.
I think this is a common misconception. The right fork has a newer style damper cartridge, and the left fork has a very archaic damper rod. The damper rod does all its damping by having fixed sized orifices that the fluid can only flow through so quickly. If you do some reading on damper rods you will come to learn that their weakness is that the maximum flow rate is quickly reached when pressure is increased, so if the hole is small enough to provide decent low speed damping by slowing fluid movement, that means if you hit a bump they will very quickly reach maximum flow rate and basically lock up on you.

That is why I said I am not 100% sure if I am bottoming out the springs, or exceeding the flow rate of the damper rod, as they would basically feel the same when hitting a bump hard enough.
 

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I removed the front forks on my Valkyrie to do a Oil change this winter, the leg with the actual damping assembly has full compression and reboud damping, the other leg is just a spring with followers, absolutely zero damping in either the compression or reboud side (both legs have springs, only one leg does both compression and rebound damping)

When looking at the parts assemblies, the pogo stick leg has zero damping hardware inside, just spring with followers, bushings etc. There are no damper rods, no cartidges, no connecting rod from the top of the fork (cap) to any damping hardware present.

This appears to be a Honda thing,
My friends VTX 1800 (2003) has a nearly identical setup (we did an oil change on his forks as well, removed the forks, one side has full compression and rebound damping, other side is just a spring with followers, aka a pogo stick)

Honda has taken this idea to the maximum with the CRF300L bike, there the forks have a spring and compression/rebound setup in one leg, the other leg does not even have a spring (a common mod for the CRF is to add a spring to the other leg)

Tazmool
 

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If/when you remove your forks, you can check and see that one leg does spring(suspension) rebound and compression damping duty, the other leg is only a spring (suspension) setup, no damping at all in either direction.

Tazmool
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here is the link to the 2014 Valkyrie on Bike Bandit:


The left fork damper rod is part number 25 circled below.

Circuit component Font Parallel Art Music


It wont do anything if the fork does not have the appropriate amount of oil, and also the weakness of them is their lack of usable range from a fixed orifice side. It is possible that Honda went oversize on the holes so it is only providing damping for very high speed events, which means you are unlikely to be able to feel anything happening when working it by hand, I am not sure on that part.
 

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25: PIPE, SEAT 51540-MJR-671
That part is just a spacer/pipe and seat that the bottom rebound spring (bottoming out spring) sits below and regular suspension spring sits on top of (above the suspension spring is another spacer that sits just below the fork cap.

There is no damping hardware inside that leg, even with the correct oil level (I set the level myself using oem honda oil) there is absolutely zero damping in either direction.

Remove your fork legs and check this yourself.
Also a good idea as the fork oil level should be checked and set every few years anyways.

Tazmool
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
25: PIPE, SEAT 51540-MJR-671
That part is just a spacer/pipe and seat that the bottom rebound spring (bottoming out spring) sits below and regular suspension spring sits on top of (above the suspension spring is another spacer that sits just below the fork cap.

There is no damping hardware inside that leg, even with the correct oil level (I set the level myself using oem honda oil) there is absolutely zero damping in either direction.

Remove your fork legs and check this yourself.
Also a good idea as the fork oil level should be checked and set every few years anyways.

Tazmool

Read post number #9 and look at the pictures.

As part of the Race Tech Gold Valve emulator install they are drilling out the damper rod holes to disable the rod damping function, basically enlarging the holes so far they no longer do anything to restrict the oil flow, so the new valve sitting on top of the damper can take over for it. That is what they mean by emulator, they are modifying an archaic damper rod to emulate a cartridge damper.

Traxxxion sells a similar setup already assembled for some bikes, although not the Goldwing, called the AR-25. Max has a good video of that here explaining about damper rods and their weaknesses:


"Your stock Showa forks have a “damper rod” in one side and an extremely low quality cartridge in the other side to control the movement of the wheel. The damper rod side is basically useless. This style of fork is used for cheap production parts. Trying to compare a damper rod fork to a proper cartridge fork is like trying to compare a carburetor to fuel injection. There simply is no comparison. The damper rod fork is the cheapest, poorest performing system of damping, and has been around the motorcycle business for so long nobody seems to be able to remember."

If you Google "Motorcycle Fork Damper Rod" you will find many similar pictures from other bikes.


Hope that helps clarify.
 

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Hmm, I may have been mistaken on this tube damper setup.

Interesting read and video,
I looked into a few more videos on how this tube/rod damper system works, it does seem to be very rudimentary (likely very cheap)

I've never seen this type of setup on any other bike I've owned (and I've had 16 bikes across 25 years, granted I did not pull the forks apart and work on every one)

If this damper rod ("tube" as Honda calls it on their parts list) does some kind of damping action, it must be very high speed only (as I pumped the fork up and down by hand, even quite vigorously and there is absolutely zero damping action, it literally feels like a pogo stick) I'm not 100% convinced it does anything on the Valk setup (or the VTX)

The cartridge damper rod side has quite a bit of damping (both compression and reboud) and it did have more rebound damping than compression damping.

Going back to the original topic however, I still don't think a GoldWing setup would work well (if at all) on the Valk due to the different part numbers, different weight of bikes (even if it does fit, it may not be suited to the Valk?)

Am interested in seeing how this unfolds.

Joel,
Have you done any static/dynamic sag measurements with you sitting on and off the bike?
You may be able to get away with just a re-spring of the bike.

Interesting topic.

Tazmool
 
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