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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New tire sitting in the garage.
Local tire place does the switch when I take the wheel in.
3 oz of BB's ready in a ziploc.
Nice sunny day and it's about 45f when I go out to the garage.

I've read the procedure and watched videos.
Easy peasy.
I do have to remove the left saddlebag.
Easy peasy.
Bike on center stand and in gear.
Easy peasy.
19 MM on socket wrench.

Fitted to the first of the 5 lug nuts and OF COURSE A GORILLA DID THEM UP.

I used a rubber mallet. Nuttin.
I use a hammer. Nuttin.

Grrrr.

I take off the saddlebag frame so I can get more heft behind the mallet/hammer.

Nuttin.

I fit a thick walled plastic pipe to the wrench. Nuttin.

I don't know it they are just stupid tight or if red loctite was used.

I call the tire guy I use and ask if I can bring the bike to him and would he use his air wrench to loosen them.

"Sure thing, come just after noon."

So that's the plan.

Ride there.
He loosens them.
I tighten them back up.
I ride home.
Remove wheel.
Drive back with wheel and new tire.
Drive home and fit wheel to bike.

I'll add if anything else goes wrong.
 

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My motto is, "nothing is EVER easy!"

Richmonder
 

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That definitely sounds like the lug nuts are on waaaay too tight, and as Richmonder stated, nothing is EVER easy...
I just did a bunch of "easy work" on my Jeep, and it was a multi day job that should have been easy.

As for your dilemma,
What I use on the "easy ones":
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Hammer drill Tool



And if they resist (as they often do)
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Camera accessory Tool


Don't need an air compressor, and they have plenty of power (especially the big 1/2" drive one)

Tazmool
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
New Achilles ATR Sport. Old - Cooper CS4 touring 195 55 r16

The Cooper was on the bike when I bought it. I found a notation saying it was fitted at 3,750 miles. It lasted about 17,000 miles.



Sometimes you have to get the tire off the bike to see how little tread is left.



I don't think it would have made the 1300 mile Hattiesburg trip.

A little off the left



Not so much off the right.






This was unexpected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Old - Cooper CS4 touring 195 55 r16 and new Achilles ATR Sport.



Sometimes you have to get the tire off the bike to see how little tread is left.



I don't think it would have made the 1300 mile Hattiesburg trip.

A little off the left



Not so much off the right.






This was unexpected.
Getting the wheel off was easy.

Getting it back on. Not so much.

The bike was stableish on the lift when I lowered it down to leave it with support under the engine guards and swingarm.

When I went to raise the bike up it got wobbly. Wobbly enough that I had to hold it.

So getting the wheel back on was going to be a problem.

Sandra tried to assist but wasn't at all happy holding the bike steady while I got the wheel in position.

I called a friend and he came over to get the wheel in place while I held the bike steady.

Lug nuts on hand tight and bike lowered to the ground and up on the center so I could tighten them.
 

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New Achilles ATR Sport. Old - Cooper CS4 touring 195 55 r16

The Cooper was on the bike when I bought it. I found a notation saying it was fitted at 3,750 miles. It lasted about 17,000 miles.



Sometimes you have to get the tire off the bike to see how little tread is left.



I don't think it would have made the 1300 mile Hattiesburg trip.

A little off the left



Not so much off the right.






This was unexpected.
What is that?
 

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Honestly they may have just been tightened to the correct spec combined with a bit of corrosion from not being removed a while. 90ft lbs is pretty snug.

I got one of these maybe 10ish years ago? 100% the best $40 bucks I have ever spent on a tool. It has done everything I have ever asked of it no matter how crazy. It gets dropped, beaten, tossed around, picked up and jerked by the cord, and the only thing that has failed is the little rubber covering over the trigger button fell off a few years ago.


I had hoped to get a single good job out of it removing some stuck on axlenuts where I didn't have access to air, but it has been an absolute champ.

Honestly I feel like any home mechanic should have an electric impact gun like this. Even folks who have good air ones, sometimes you don't want to break out all the hoses, wait for the compressor to air up, deal with the noise, etc, or are just doing a job somewhere where air isn't easily available.

For anyone who does mechanic work and hasn't used an impact gun, just get one, trust me it is SO worth it. Forgot to loosen the lug nuts before you jacked it off the ground? No problem. Working on something so tight you are gonna strip it? No problem. I legit used this with a 1/2” > 3/8” > 1/4” > 6mm socket > chopped Allen wrench the other day to get one of the SUPER tight Allen bolts out of the bottom of my Valk fork tube. I was very concerned just manual force would strip it, and it is in a deep recessed pocket that would have turned the job into a huge pain. I felt silly as hell using it with 2 reducing adapters, a socket, and a ~6" chopped Allen wrench, but it worked perfectly.
 

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Honestly they may have just been tightened to the correct spec combined with a bit of corrosion from not being removed a while. 90ft lbs is pretty snug.

I got one of these maybe 10ish years ago? 100% the best $40 bucks I have ever spent on a tool. It has done everything I have ever asked of it no matter how crazy. It gets dropped, beaten, tossed around, picked up and jerked by the cord, and the only thing that has failed is the little rubber covering over the trigger button fell off a few years ago.


I had hoped to get a single good job out of it removing some stuck on axlenuts where I didn't have access to air, but it has been an absolute champ.

Honestly I feel like any home mechanic should have an electric impact gun like this. Even folks who have good air ones, sometimes you don't want to break out all the hoses, wait for the compressor to air up, deal with the noise, etc, or are just doing a job somewhere where air isn't easily available.

For anyone who does mechanic work and hasn't used an impact gun, just get one, trust me it is SO worth it. Forgot to loosen the lug nuts before you jacked it off the ground? No problem. Working on something so tight you are gonna strip it? No problem. I legit used this with a 1/2” > 3/8” > 1/4” > 6mm socket > chopped Allen wrench the other day to get one of the SUPER tight Allen bolts out of the bottom of my Valk fork tube. I was very concerned just manual force would strip it, and it is in a deep recessed pocket that would have turned the job into a huge pain. I felt silly as hell using it with 2 reducing adapters, a socket, and a ~6" chopped Allen wrench, but it worked perfectly.
Thanks for sharing Joel. I've been wanting an impact for rotating tires on my cars and this should be fine for once a year use. I checked your link and there is an additional coupon code for 30% savings that expires today. I'm heading to Harbor Freight. (y)
 
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