Honda Valkyrie F6C Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning:
So, I just moved a few months ago from Virginia to South Dakota. In Virginia, I never had to winterize because if it was above 45 or so, I would still ride (which happened frequently enough there). Now, I am in for a cold winter. What should I be aware of. I have a shed to store her, but not heated. Besides stabilizer in the gas (it's ethanol free, anyway) and disconnecting the battery, anything else I should be aware of? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Good morning:
So, I just moved a few months ago from Virginia to South Dakota. In Virginia, I never had to winterize because if it was above 45 or so, I would still ride (which happened frequently enough there). Now, I am in for a cold winter. What should I be aware of. I have a shed to store her, but not heated. Besides stabilizer in the gas (it's ethanol free, anyway) and disconnecting the battery, anything else I should be aware of? Thanks!
Wait a minute... We had another Virginia member on here and you never told us? Where did you live? Here I was convinced Rick and I were the only ones. Maybe there are others?

Richmonder
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
As a native South Dakotan now living in western Washington, I offer the following:

I would put the battery on an AGM battery trickle charger (no need to disconnect if you have a pigtail) and pump the tires up. Change the oil and top off the tank to minimize the vapor space. Add gas treatment (E10 is not anymore an issue than none alcohol fuels). Put a few mile on the bike to get the treated fuel and fresh oil though out the bike.

I tried to ride my bike weekly if possible and keep the fuel tank topped off to reduce the tank vapor space as much as possible. Vapor space is where condensation occurs. With closed fuel systems on modern vehicles, water in the fuel is not the problem it was in the last century. Fuel injection has changed things too.

Winters are far milder than when I lived there. I don’t think it get -25F as much. Where in SD are you living. Perhaps EAFB?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
As a native South Dakotan now living in western Washington, I offer the following:

I would put the battery on an AGM battery trickle charger (no need to disconnect if you have a pigtail) and pump the tires up. Change the oil and top off the tank to minimize the vapor space. Add gas treatment (E10 is not anymore an issue than none alcohol fuels). Put a few mile on the bike to get the treated fuel and fresh oil though out the bike.

I tried to ride my bike weekly if possible and keep the fuel tank topped off to reduce the tank vapor space as much as possible. Vapor space is where condensation occurs. With closed fuel systems on modern vehicles, water in the fuel is not the problem it was in the last century. Fuel injection has changed things too.

Winters are far milder than when I lived there. I don’t think it get -25F as much. Where in SD are you living. Perhaps EAFB?
Great info
Yeah I know, I'm a flat lander. I did live in Seattle, Alaska and New Hampshire though so feel qualified to chime in. Farthers info. is solid.
I never removed the battery either, just pigtail to trickle charger. I believe a "topped off" an treated fuel tank is extremely important as it will eliminate the possibility of a rusted tank as well as water from condensation in your fuel.
Airing up your tires is good as well to help hold the shape from temperature change and sheer weight of the bike sitting for months. I would go one step further and get the bike up on a center stand if you have one, getting the weight off the tires. I've used jack stands as well. This is debatable, just my preference. If you have ever rode on flat spots, you'll understand where I'm coming from. One last thing. Hang dryer sheets on the underside of your bike, full length of the bike. This will deter mice from getting up inside and building nests which will clog your air filter and chewing through your wiring insulation. Just a little bit of preparation can save you many hours and dollars come your spring riding season. Enjoy your winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Apologies for the delay - work has been busy. Much appreciate for all the feedback, and I will be employing the information. Also, I was on the Eastern Shore (Onancock), so I lived 4 hours from Richmond area. With a wife and two younger kids, two days jaunts aren't in the cards! Thanks a bunch!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Cool! We'll have to await some footage from the Black Hills from you!

Richmonder
 

·
Registered
1998 Valkyrie 1500C
Joined
·
9 Posts
Good morning:
So, I just moved a few months ago from Virginia to South Dakota. In Virginia, I never had to winterize because if it was above 45 or so, I would still ride (which happened frequently enough there). Now, I am in for a cold winter. What should I be aware of. I have a shed to store her, but not heated. Besides stabilizer in the gas (it's ethanol free, anyway) and disconnecting the battery, anything else I should be aware of? Thanks!
Good question. Simple stuff. Run most of the gas out of your tank, go put 2 gallons of either racing fuel or AV fuel (110 octane). That stuff does NOT have any of that crappy ethanol in it, that crap will gum up your fuel system and more! Put a trickle charger on it. Roll the bike onto some dense foam pads (to prevent flat spots). Put sandwich baggies over the end of the exhaust pipes securing them with rubber bands. If you can put it in climate control, that's good otherwise engage the fork locks and cover it. Hope that helps
 

·
Registered
1998 Valkyrie 1500C
Joined
·
9 Posts
Good question. Simple stuff. Run most of the gas out of your tank, go put 2 gallons of either racing fuel or AV fuel (110 octane). That stuff does NOT have any of that crappy ethanol in it, that crap will gum up your fuel system and more! Put a trickle charger on it. Roll the bike onto some dense foam pads (to prevent flat spots). Put sandwich baggies over the end of the exhaust pipes securing them with rubber bands. If you can put it in climate control, that's good otherwise engage the fork locks and cover it. Hope that helps
Oh ya, drier sheets placed under the gas tank to keep critters out of the air filter area.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top