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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Front tire is almost completely slick on the left side. I’ve never seen this on any bikes I’ve owned. These are the oems. I have a new set coming this week.
Any ideas?
 

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You need to turn right more often. Might be the crown of the road wearing your tire.
I run 42 lbs in the front and 40 in the rear.
How many miles do you have on the bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You need to turn right more often. Might be the crown of the road wearing your tire.
I run 42 lbs in the front and 40 in the rear.
How many miles do you have on the bike?
Ha! Turning right seems to be a fix, huh?

Although 36psi is the correct pressure, I now wish I had put more in it. Back tire still has a good bit of tread left on it. Bike has about 8800 miles on it so far.
 

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This bike is notorious for being extremely sensitive to tire inflation - and hard on tires in general.
I just turned over 20000 miles and am installing my 5th rear and 4th front this weekend. As an aside... this is nuts!
I would agree that it appears you need more air, based upon the wear pattern.
Another couple options may be:
1) Your traffic patterns? Left hand turns are always longer than right hand turns, hence, over time, you get more wear on the left.
2) if the road crowns on your daily routes are greater than usual, this will also wear out the left side first.

As far as under-inflation, while the pic below is car based, it is still valid.
Underinflation always wears out the edges first, and the center last. I find it amazing that your tire center looks so good.

With proper inflation (or over-inflation) , the center will always wear out first.
The only time this in invalid is if you play Ricky Racer at high cornering speeds, taking out the edges first. In reality, this bike grounds too easily to be playing Ricky Racer to that degree.

Many - if not most - folks on this forum - and the other - run at higher than Honda recommendations.

Another thing to check may be to verify the accuracy of your tire gauge. I bought a Motion Pro "Pro" Tire Gauge from Revzilla a few years ago; at $75 not cheap. But a superb investment if you do your own stuff. It seems no matter who does work on my stuff - from the Jeep Dealer for our cars to the local oil change shop to about 3 dealers in town I trust to change my moto tires, I almost NEVER find the tires match my own gauge. It seems slightly more are low reading than high - but not by much. It is ...interesting... that almost everybody puts all their faith in $1.99 or even free promotional Chinese air pressure gauges. After I bought it, and primarily to shut-up the wife :x, (you spent $75 on a tire gauge???), I purchased three of the $1.00 special gauges at my local O'Reillys. None matched mine, and all were different from each other, with the range from highest to lowest being 8 psi. I binned the 2 that were the worst, and kept the one that was only off by 2. But that was still an 8 psi variance, when measuring a 32 psi tire! In what other endeavor is a 75% success rate considered acceptable? :eek: While The Motion Pro is a bit...unwieldy, whenever I take a long trip it goes in the tool bag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've always had to get used to tires and pressure for each bike I've owned with the valk being no exception. Now that I see the results on the oem tire, I will work to use correct amount of air. I agree, I do need to get the best gauge I can get. I have several different cheapies. I am somewhat perplexed with how this front tire has worn and the rear still in good shape.

No doubt, I should have had more air in it and can only defend my ideology with the extremely poor pothole riddled roads I have to ride on. I hate em!

Finally, the DOT is starting to re-pave some of the 2-lanes I like to ride but they have a long way to go. I can feel every stinking bump and spend a great deal of time dodging both the holes as well as the patches they've paved which can sometimes be worse than the holes. End of rant..................... :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My tire change experience today:

Earlier in the week I made an appointment to have new tires mounted and balanced. Got to the dealer at 9 this morning. I noticed an older valk when I pulled in and when I walked in service area, I saw a giant of a man talking to employee. He had a blk leather doo, brown leather vest and chaps. Found out he was 7 ft tall. He only wanted a front tire mounted.

Long story short, they thought he was their appt and my bike was on the back burner. I was there 9-5:30pm.

I took it all in stride and met so many great people and because I had to wait, got a discount. It really screwed up my riding time. Weather was perfect!

I have a couple of new guys I'll contact to ride with although I'm mostly a solo rider kind of guy but will possibly make exceptions now.

The 7 foot guy was a hoot to get know and he had me laughing my fool head off with stories of idiots looking for a fight until he stepped out of his truck and stood up taller than goliath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I noticed pic of tires I posted struggle to load so here is a different look. The service manager said the tech was running into a problem with adding the weights. He said each time he'd try, tire would be too heavy. I didn't really understand but he eventually worked it out. I looked for the weights afterward and was impressed. They were square and black and hard to see at first. Very nice!

 

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DP, it IS the crown of the road that wears the left side of the front tire more quicker. the obvious solution is to cross the center line whenever possible and work the other side of the tire an equal amount. kidding aside. Some engineer types will take exception to the road crown stating it isn't angled enough to cause this anomaly. They don't take into account that even with a minimal amount of drainage crown tilt, the motorcycle doesn't ride perpendicular to the road but to the center of the earth. If it were perpendicular to the road it will drift to right shoulder in short order. So to maintain a straight line down the hiway, you must tilt your bike minimally, unconsciously, unnoticeably left to keep it going straight. In essence you are continually climbing using and scrubbing the left side of the front tire. Airplanes have to do this by trimming tab on the rear rudder. its called yawing.
 

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In what other endeavor is a 75% success rate considered acceptable?
PG, well there is software and technology. at 75% operational, beta is considered a successful launch. But of course swinging for the fence, your are a king with a mere 33% in baseball. and that pays top notch moola. poncho
 
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