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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My garage has no motorcycle in it--and for a number of years it would have 2. I finally gave up. It got to the point where my left hand would go numb after only 20 minutes of riding. I tried many things to get the Valk to fit, but with back and neck issues, I just gave up.

I do think the Valkyrie is one of the best engineered---most under-rated--solid performers--most bullet proof machines, and I must add "non marketed" to the list. It is unlike ANYTHING I have owned, and I have owned more than my share, but I just could not get it to fit where I could ride. Oh well. You guys be safe out there. BTW, I have a Corbin Gunfighter seat and a few other items I listed for sale in the parts and gear section if you are interested.
 

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Mr. O.G.,
My heartfelt empathies to you, Sir. I'm 69 and have started making different decisions myself this past year or so. I'm fortunately pretty healthy, but after a lifetime of doing things that have had long-term physical repercussions I am also feeling my different body parts, well, I]differently[/I]. Right along the lines of what you've described, plus a new pain in my feet. I bought a nice convertible last fall as bike season waned so I could still get my hair in the wind, but that didn't work as I'm totally bald. I thought I'd ride the bike more this year and keep the convertible in the garage most of the time, but due to all kinds of factors, including the fact that all of my favorite places to ride to have been closed down, I find myself just putting the top down and enjoying the sun that way more than I'd have guessed. Much more comfortable on my lower back (my Valk doesn't have the full back massage option with the heated pulse function) and I feel like I'm enjoying the outdoors much the same. Don't misunderstand, I've been riding all my life and still love it, but I'm more often choosing the tamer horse in the barn for simple daily use. I knew these days were coming, but I've really tried to pretend I was just as good as last year for a number of years now. I know for a fact that a lot of my riding friends are getting to the same stage. Try not to get down about it by dwelling on the loss of the bike, Mr. O.G., and try to find a new way to get some of the grins back. All of the best to you!
 

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The numb hand problem is carpal tunnel syndrome. Pretty easy fix these days:

https://www.jeffecker.com.au/video/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/
(CAUTION: Long Post!) That is quite possibly the case and I was going to address that issue when I commented above, but when Mr. O.G. mentioned the accompanying back and neck pain I just left it alone. The median nerve, one of the three main nerves in the arm (radial and ulnar being the other two) does go all the way up the arm and into the shoulder and into the main neural network in the spine. When the median nerve becomes inflamed due to increased Carpal Tunnel pressure, it can cause that irritation to go all the way up. I didn't mention the other aspects to this as the OP had said he already had sold his last bike and I didn't want to tantalize him nor diagnose him from afar. I thought that might be cruel teasing of potentially false hope. The video you attached does show a couple of CTS surgery methods (there are others less invasive) but there was no mention of some of the potential downsides to the surgery. (Cost, especially if not insured, risk of nerves damaged due to a nick from a scalpel, slow recovery time for some, and the biggest one: going back to the same activity that caused the problem in the first place. Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are not the only causal factor. Extreme cold, vibration (not on OUR bikes!), a bad fall, pregnancy and other factors come into play. It's been around forever, thus the other names for it such as "Stagecoach Driver's Hands", "Washer-Woman's Syndrome", "Truck Driver's Hands", ad infinitum.) Both of my grandfathers had it. One was a barber all his life and the other was a dentist all of his life. They overused their flexors every single working day! What happens is that the flexor muscles have been over-used and over-developed in comparison to the extensor muscles on the back of your forearm. No one ever exercises the extensors. Why bother? It takes no strength to let something go. It just takes strength to grip it. Remember the cautionary tales in the '50s-'60s about becoming "muscle-bound"? Fallacy. That's just a result of an unbalanced workout routine. I could go on for another 1000 words, easy, but you can read my entire cover-story article on the subject in OSHA magazine that was published in the '90s when I co-founded Repetitive Motion Trauma Corporation (aka RMTC) in Itasca, Illinois. My degree is in biomechanics and exercise physiology and it was a simple $20 exercise apparatus and program that strengthened the extensor group and stretched the flexor group. Worked very well and sold the business about eight years later to a BioTech company in Lincolnshire, Illinois. Sold thousands of them to chiropractors and physical therapists, as well as many companies with known CTS problems like Tyson Foods. (Cutting up chickens all day in a cold meat locker was a sure cause of the problem.) Did you know that wrist pain is the #2 reason people go to chiropractors? The Gonstead Chiropractic Clinic of Mt. Horub, Wisconsin would have me come up to do an all day seminar on the subject each year for their incoming students.

I don't say any of that to toot my own horn. I only said what I said to offer some credibility to "just some stuff I read on a forum today". I haven't been involved with that company since the sale over twenty-some years ago and it's probably defunct now, but go online an look for exercises for Carpal Tunnel. Several companies ripped off my concept and produced some interesting, more complicated and more expensive exercise items for this purpose, but it really is very simple. That was a problem with the company, RMTC. It was patented, but too easy to end-run around for the competitors that popped up.

Sorry for the long post, but there wasn't really any other way to get my points across for people who genuinely suffer from CTS, which can be debilitating. (PS: the reason for the so-called "night pain" is because many/most people tend to get into a semi-prenatal position and that bends the wrists in while you sleep. This action increases the pressure in the Carpal Tunnel and causes the pain. Also, if you do elect surgery, opt for NOT cutting the flexor retinaculum "band" that was mentioned in the video. It's a ligament and does not heal as fast or as well as other tissues such as muscle. If anyone wants more specific info on all of this for any reason, I would be glad to help if I can. Just PM me. I have no financial interest in your pain.) God Bless.
 

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KUGO, reading your post again I'm homing in on the comment that the big risk factor is returning to the activity that caused the problem. That is indeed a concern if one get's their wrists slit only for problem to recur. In your experience is that a highly likely outcome? OX, care to comment here?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Let me just jump in here to say I do not have CTS. I never said I had CTS. My wife has CTS and she had one hand operated on last year and the other scheduled for October. She has the "burning hand" effect when she wakes up. I have nothing like that at all. My hands are fine.

What I have is degenerative disc disease up and down my upper and lower back causing stenosis around a number of nerves. At least that is what I was told by a neurologist and neurosurgeon after reading the MRI. Reaching out for an extended period of time as well as battling the wind resistance does something to limit circulation or else pinches nerves and affects my limbs. When I stop and get off, it goes away.

I did however enjoy the education.
 

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KUGO, reading your post again I'm homing in on the comment that the big risk factor is returning to the activity that caused the problem. That is indeed a concern if one get's their wrists slit only for problem to recur. In your experience is that a highly likely outcome? OX, care to comment here?
Absolutely, Geepers. That is another thing I didn't get into much above. It's been too long now for me to remember the specific percentage (it was high) of people who had the surgery only to have another one in the future, and I don't want to blow my credibility by guessing, but that was actually a selling point I would use when making presentations to corporations interested in using the program. Companies would have to pony up around $30,000/wrist for workers' comp (in the '90s!) if the injury was deemed to be work-related. Typists (from professional office data entry people to secretarial pool employees) would have to be able to type very quickly. Each keystroke required several ounces of pressure. Much more in the "old days" with mechanical typewriters. If he/she only typed 80 words-per-minute (not that fast), by the end of the day you would have pressed the equivalent of many tons. With your finger tips! And then you'd go back tomorrow, the next day, week, year, again and again. If, after CTS surgery, you go back to the activity that caused the problem in the first place you will most likely end up having further difficulties unless you've learned to balance the flexor/extensor musculature and stretch foreshortened ligaments and tendons. (Yes, they are both capable of limited stretching, just like nerves, unlike what I was taught at the University of Iowa in the early '70s.) This helps ease the pressure and ultimate chafing of the synovial sheathes. When a sheath is damaged, more synovial fluid comes rushing to the rescue, pressures build in the Carpal Tunnel (which consists of nine, pebble-like carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum ligament), and that causes irritation of the median nerve. There is very little room for the median nerve in that tunnel when undue pressures build up, which only increase as the nerve inflames. (The ulnar and radial nerves are usually not affected in the same way. I developed another product/program for Tennis and Golfer's Elbow - Lateral and Medial Epicondylitis. Same principles, different apparatus and exercises/stretches.) As a matter of fact, when people opt for the flexor retinaculum release method of surgery (snipping it in two like a watchband) they usually experience immediate pain relief. The pain comes later with the healing, unless enough drugs are used, temporary loss of work and mobility and, often, bills for PT, etc. Again, it's all about imbalances in the body. You would never think of exercising your biceps all day every day and not exercise your triceps, too. The imbalances created would eventually cause problems. Hope this helps, Geepers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FYI--- added other stuff in the for sale section. Accessories keep showing up after the bike is gone.
 
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