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Been riding for many years on alot of different bikes, but i just purchased a 2014 Valkyrie on a impulse buy and have to say that so far it could be my favorite. Will be browsing the forums here for advice and add-ons to make it my own. Still a little sad that i wont be able to use it for 4 months or so. For my test ride it was 27 degrees but i still fell in love with the bike!
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Best impulse buy ever! You won't be disappointed.

Where in the Midwest?

Richmonder (a former Iowan)
 

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I'm guessing from your handle that you're from Iowa, and from your photo that you're from Swaleville, which is a town I never heard of before. I'm an Iowa boy at heart and still consider Iowa my home. Grew up in Fort Madison, graduated from Simpson College and lived in Indianola for several years before moving to Richmond. I actually bought my Valk from a dealer in Storm Lake on consignment!

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Welcome from DFW, TX
 

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Welcome, from a born-and-bred Hawkeye! Although I now live in central Illinois, I grew up in Iowa City and, years later, occasionally lived in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids (I coached swimming teams in all three towns and helped each team, in succession, become Iowa A.A.U. state champions way back in the early '70s.) My grandfather's family was from Ankeny, not far from you. When I was in college I was coaching the Des Moines Golf & Country Club (West Des Moines, and also coached the Waukonda Club in D.M.; boy, does that bring back memories!) I would sometimes have to go back to I.C. to see my parents, usually for money. And good cooking. I only had a 250cc Suzuki X-6 Hustler motorcycle back then and going back and forth 90 miles each way, at night with semis blowing past me, still gives me chills. Your new bike is a whole new experience and I hope you enjoy yours as much as most all of us on this forum enjoy ours.
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Kugo! Another former Iowan! And a kindred spirit. You know what I miss most about Iowa? Maid Rites. And tenderloins. Nobody outside the Midwest has a clue what a tenderloin is.

Richmonder
 

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Kugo! Another former Iowan! And a kindred spirit. You know what I miss most about Iowa? Maid Rites. And tenderloins. Nobody outside the Midwest has a clue what a tenderloin is.

Richmonder
Amen, Brother!!! "Loose Meat" sandwiches, not "Sloppy Joes", for those unfamiliar with what we're talking about. These hamburger bun-sized morsels make DQ's BBQ sandwiches pale in comparison (which are also too sweet, IMO), and as long as you had the pickles and ketchup and/or mustard, maybe an optional square of American cheese, and your eyes would squint with each immensely pleasurable bite. And Maid Rites knew how to make a great chocolate malt, too! They're a unique icon of Hawkeye rural cuisine. And half the men sitting beside you at their stools at the lunch counter over the noon hour had green John Deere or red seed company aerated farmer-style ball-caps, hiding very un-sunburned foreheads and thinning pates. You could see that because, back then, most men would take off their caps/hats when entering any establishment; because that's how their mothers and fathers had taught them. How quaint. (And, as a kid, I'd marvel at their sinewy, sunburned forearms and strong gnarled hands wrapped around their delicate Maid Rite sandwich buns. The pork tenderloins you referred to, for the benefit of "non-fly-over city folks", could be found at many an Iowa tavern that would base their entire business' reputation and advertising campaign (within a whole ten mile radio-coverage radius) on how "big as a (insert euphemism here)" their tenderloin sandwiches were and they would often literally hang over the edge of the entire dinner plate. If you've ever seen one of these luncheon plate specials with fries, dill pickles and coleslaw on a regular-size hamburger bun with the tenderloin hanging out a full five inches around the outside of the bun, you don't know what we're talking about. Oh, yum. And sorry for hi-jacking this thread with Richmonder, and please excuse the drool marks on this post!
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Amen, Brother!!! "Loose Meat" sandwiches, not "Sloppy Joes", for those unfamiliar with what we're talking about. These hamburger bun-sized morsels make DQ's BBQ sandwiches pale in comparison (which are also too sweet, IMO), and as long as you had the pickles and ketchup and/or mustard, maybe an optional square of American cheese, and your eyes would squint with each immensely pleasurable bite. And Maid Rites knew how to make a great chocolate malt, too! They're a unique icon of Hawkeye rural cuisine. And half the men sitting beside you at their stools at the lunch counter over the noon hour had green John Deere or red seed company aerated farmer-style ball-caps, hiding very un-sunburned foreheads and thinning pates. You could see that because, back then, most men would take off their caps/hats when entering any establishment; because that's how their mothers and fathers had taught them. How quaint. (And, as a kid, I'd marvel at their sinewy, sunburned forearms and strong gnarled hands wrapped around their delicate Maid Rite sandwich buns. The pork tenderloins you referred to, for the benefit of "non-fly-over city folks", could be found at many an Iowa tavern that would base their entire business' reputation and advertising campaign (within a whole ten mile radio-coverage radius) on how "big as a (insert euphemism here)" their tenderloin sandwiches were and they would often literally hang over the edge of the entire dinner plate. If you've ever seen one of these luncheon plate specials with fries, dill pickles and coleslaw on a regular-size hamburger bun with the tenderloin hanging out a full five inches around the outside of the bun, you don't know what we're talking about. Oh, yum. And sorry for hi-jacking this thread with Richmonder, and please excuse the drool marks on this post!
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Hah hah! LOVE it. People just have NO idea what they're missing. I'm drooling just thinking about all that!

Richmonder
 

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Also an impulse buy a couple of weeks ago and I've been riding for decades on many different bikes. So far, I love this thing and since I am in Arizona (70's, sunny), I plan to head to the mountains and see what she can do!
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