Honda Valkyrie F6C Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be installing a brand new gas tank fairly soon. Will I have to transfer anything over from the old one to the new one or will it just be a simple swap ? Any info would be great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Assuming you don't have the new fuel tank yet? (otherwise you'd know what it came with?) Is it a bare tank? or did it come from a donor bike?

The fuel pump and fuel level sensor are internal.
If your new tank did not come with those (new oem tanks usually don't as the pump and sensor units are quite expensive and seperate units)
You'll need to move over that unit. I would suggest getting a new seal/gasket as you really don't want a fuel leak.

If the tank is from a donor bike, then just a straight swap.

Tazmool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Assuming you don't have the new fuel tank yet? (otherwise you'd know what it came with?) Is it a bare tank? or did it come from a donor bike?

The fuel pump and fuel level sensor are internal.
If your new tank did not come with those (new oem tanks usually don't as the pump and sensor units are quite expensive and seperate units)
You'll need to move over that unit. I would suggest getting a new seal/gasket as you really don't want a fuel leak.

If the tank is from a donor bike, then just a straight swap.

Tazmool
Correct I don't have It yet, it's an oem tank straight from honda . The person that I bought the bike from damaged the side panels and gas tank so new parts have been ordered at his expense. Fuel pump should be fairly straight forward to remove and switch over I'm assuming, and good thinking on the gasket. Would the fuel level sensor be attached to fuel pump or also separate? Hard to move over you think ? Greatly appreciate the response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I haven't pulled the pump on the Valkyrie myself, but it should be a fairly straight forward process.
Looking at a parts diagram, its a simple assembly, installs on the bottom of the tank, pump and level sensor in one assembly.

I do suggest replacing the gasket, the old one should be fine, but its a lot of work to pull the tank, remove the pump assembly and replace the gasket, just because its leaking (not to mention if it leaks, it will be leaking on top of the engine)

Tazmool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I haven't pulled the pump on the Valkyrie myself, but it should be a fairly straight forward process.
Looking at a parts diagram, its a simple assembly, installs on the bottom of the tank, pump and level sensor in one assembly.

I do suggest replacing the gasket, the old one should be fine, but its a lot of work to pull the tank, remove the pump assembly and replace the gasket, just because its leaking (not to mention if it leaks, it will be leaking on top of the engine)

Tazmool
True , thanks. More than likely the person who damaged will do the swap but I'm getting myself ready just incase I have to do it. Yea overall doesn't seem too bad...lots of parts and plastics have to come off but I think I can handle the job. Do u see any issues with any pressure in the gas tank , I sometimes see stories of gas tanks imploding on themselves ? Not sure if I have anything to worry about in that regard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Low pressure in the fuel tank is caused by the gas cap not venting properly, a very rare ocurrence (it would lead to the bike stalling or running poorly due to low fuel pressure, before damage to the actual fuel tank occurs, especially on the rouded profiles of motorcycle tanks)
Excessive pressure in the tank is more common than low pressure. I would not worry about either.

Fuel tanks are usually pressurized as gasoline vapor pressure is relatively high (it gasses off readily and pressurizes its container) there is even a system on our bikes (charcoal cannister) to capture the gasoline vapors, store them (in the charcoal canister) and release them into the engine intake to be burned. The system is designed to pressurize to a certain pressure before releasing the pressure to the atmosphere.

Swapping out the fuel pump I would say is actually less work than getting the fuel tank off our bikes. As you mentioned, there is a lot of hardware that needs to come off just to get the fuel tank.

Swapping out the fuel pump itself is fairly easy. You definitely must start off with an empty fuel tank. The pump is at the very bottom of the tank so anything inside will leak right out when you remove the pump assembly.
Definitely have very, very good ventilation when doing the job (gasoline fumes are not good for you, and flammable/explosive at the right concentrations)

When installing the pump, make sure to use a new gasket (as mentioned before) and to use the correct torque/procedures, (ie cross bolt pattern on any pump housing, you do not want to warp that sealing surface etc) Clean the sealing surfaces as well.
Also, pay particular attention to the hoses connected to the bottom of the fuel tank and their routing.
It would cause all kinds of problems to have kinked/pinched hoses under there, and a lot of work to correct.
Starting off with a completely empty fuel tank will make handling it easier as well (the tank is much lighter when empty)

Speaking of saving yourself some work. If you do end up doing the work yourself, change out your air filter when you have the tank off.
To change the air filter on the Valkyrie, the fuel tank has to come off...... its a goldwing thing....not the best design in that regard.

It sounds like a fun afternoon, but its really not that bad, and very doable by someone handy with a wrench.

Tazmool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Low pressure in the fuel tank is caused by the gas cap not venting properly, a very rare ocurrence (it would lead to the bike stalling or running poorly due to low fuel pressure, before damage to the actual fuel tank occurs, especially on the rouded profiles of motorcycle tanks)
Excessive pressure in the tank is more common than low pressure. I would not worry about either.

Fuel tanks are usually pressurized as gasoline vapor pressure is relatively high (it gasses off readily and pressurizes its container) there is even a system on our bikes (charcoal cannister) to capture the gasoline vapors, store them (in the charcoal canister) and release them into the engine intake to be burned. The system is designed to pressurize to a certain pressure before releasing the pressure to the atmosphere.

Swapping out the fuel pump I would say is actually less work than getting the fuel tank off our bikes. As you mentioned, there is a lot of hardware that needs to come off just to get the fuel tank.

Swapping out the fuel pump itself is fairly easy. You definitely must start off with an empty fuel tank. The pump is at the very bottom of the tank so anything inside will leak right out when you remove the pump assembly.
Definitely have very, very good ventilation when doing the job (gasoline fumes are not good for you, and flammable/explosive at the right concentrations)

When installing the pump, make sure to use a new gasket (as mentioned before) and to use the correct torque/procedures, (ie cross bolt pattern on any pump housing, you do not want to warp that sealing surface etc) Clean the sealing surfaces as well.
Also, pay particular attention to the hoses connected to the bottom of the fuel tank and their routing.
It would cause all kinds of problems to have kinked/pinched hoses under there, and a lot of work to correct.
Starting off with a completely empty fuel tank will make handling it easier as well (the tank is much lighter when empty)

Speaking of saving yourself some work. If you do end up doing the work yourself, change out your air filter when you have the tank off.
To change the air filter on the Valkyrie, the fuel tank has to come off...... its a goldwing thing....not the best design in that regard.

It sounds like a fun afternoon, but its really not that bad, and very doable by someone handy with a wrench.

Tazmool
Awesome thank you very much . Two great points, replace the gasket where the fuel pump sits ans also might as well replace the air filter. I actually used the air filter change video on YouTube to prep for how to remove the side cowels and gas tank. Again. Thank you for the information.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top