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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for no photos, but I can't get that to work on this forum. Anyway, I installed a USB port to my handlebars this weekend and thought I'd share the process.

1) Remove two bolts holding the instrument panel display. These bolts are directly below the face of the display. Mine were really tight, so expect some resistance.
2) Peel back the rubber grommet where the wiring goes into the instrument panel. This allows you to easily unplug the wiring harness and put the instrument panel out of your way.
3) Remove the electrical tape from wiring below the grommet.
4) Locate the Solid Green wire (Ground) and the Solid White wire (+12V)
5) Carefully remove a small section of insulation from these wires (1/8") exposing the copper braided wiring.
6) Solder your USB plug onto these wires. The USB Kit I used included a quick disconnect and fuse box. I used both, but cut the wires and resoldered to the desired length.
7) Turn the key to the ON position. No need to start the bike. Test your USB power port. This should work with the bike in the ON position, but will not work in the ACC position.
8) Re-tape all the exposed wiring with electrical tape. Be sure to first tape up the new solder joints, then tape everything else up.
9) Re-connect the instrument panel and seat the grommet.
10) Re-install the two instrument panel bolts, zip tie or otherwise secure your USB connection.


This is the USB wiring I used.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DYE54LI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Was there a reason for doing it that way instead of just using the supplied wire to hook into your battery? I've been wanting to do something like this but your way seems a lot harder and I hate soldering. :)
 

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Thanks for the walkthrough Sensei.

turboyoshi, those usb plugs (Not the cigarette lighter types) will drain power even with nothing plugged into them so having it hooked into the bikes on/off circuit prevents some tears if you don't run your bike for a while.

I actually bypassed the bikes wiring and went straight to the battery BUT I put a switch on the left side of the bike near the key for the fuel door. This way I can keep charging various things while having a break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What Shrubbo said, and I didn't want to remove the tank (I think is necessary) to route the wiring. I have a service manual, so the usual hard part of figuring out what wire to use was easy. All those steps sound hard, but can be done in about an hour. Of course, I don't mind soldering because i'm quite good at it. If you purchased a decent soldering iron, you probably wouldn't hate it. It's a real pain with one of those cheapo radio shack $20 units - they simply don't hold consistent heat well. Something like this is what I use. I've had it about 20 years, and just replaced my 1st tip this last year ($4). These kind really do last forever.

https://www.amazon.com/Quality-Mode...9&sr=8-3&keywords=hakko+936+soldering+station
 

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Most of us dont do enough soldering to make it worth buying that iron, I used to do board level repair back in the day and too many easy ways to mess with soldering for most people.
Most people have never soldered before.
Some T-connectors work well and I have had some on my bike for 6 years for a trailer and they are still working fine .
JMHO
 

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I used standard female cigarette lighter plugs in my left saddlebag. Wired straight to the battery with a fuse. Never had any issues with it killing the battery. Although my bike gets ridden fairly frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I used standard female cigarette lighter plugs in my left saddlebag. Wired straight to the battery with a fuse. Never had any issues with it killing the battery. Although my bike gets ridden fairly frequently.
Cigarette lighter plugs are only connection points - when nothing is plugged in there is no battery drain. USB converters are "always on" due to voltage conversion circuitry, even when no devices are plugged into them.
 

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It is surprising just how much they use. **** you transformers :)

Also if you are not good at soldering or splicing in then these things are your best friend...

http://www.posi-products.com/posiplug.html

You don't have to feed the wire through them as it sort of suggests in the diagram, there is in fact a slot in those caps so you can tap onto any wire without removing/cutting/whatever.

lovely things.
 

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i spent some money on this setup with all different setup and ended up buying the Honda OEM 12v socket! it costs me more than it should has been! i guess it is just me mucking around too much which should has been quite simple just to buy the Honda OEM 12v socket and plug directly into the dummy connector under the seat which is already there to have it wired properly via the ignition switch.
 

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Sensei,
Thank you. I would not have considered that solution. Very clean and avoids running a separate wire from under the saddle. BTW, my power wires to the combination meter were primary - light green/ black and secondary - light green.

Shrubbo,
Thank you. I considered running a wire direct from the battery. Never knew a vacant USB would draw power.
 
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