Honda Valkyrie F6C Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I've been thinking about a dual sport for quite some time.
Last year I had a chance to swing a leg over a friend's WR250R, took it out on a short-ish ride, jammed it into some weeds, climbed a few ditches, rode it on the street and I was instantly thinking: Yep... I'd like one of these.

Additionally, this was before I had my Valkyrie, and my only bike at the time was a Yamaha Tenere 700, which I did off-road a bit.
After riding the WRR, I knew instantly that the Tenere was going to go to a new owner and I was ready to move on.

I knew I wanted something different for road riding (Tenere700 to Valkyrie or VMax) and for dirt and trail riding (Tenere700 to WRR/DualSport of some kind)

I'm not saying the WRR or Valkyrie are better than the T7, but for me, they made more sense.
The T7 off road is great for an accomplished off-road rider, Check out: Pol Tarres the seeker, Tenere 700
But for me, its brutally heavy for a dirt bike (I weighed mine at 450lbs) its tall, wide, felt incredibly intimidating on the dirt, and on the street, I was just not enjoying the T7 all that much. So I got my Valk for street riding, and never looked back.

Fast forward some months, searching for dual sports (wrr on top of my list), and almost as a fluke a CRF300L popped up very close to me.
Its about a year old, priced well (cheaper than a 10 year old WRR) but needed a bit of work (it sat a for almost a year, and needed a few parts to make it the way I wanted it for me, front & rear springs as its way under-sprung, skid plate, hand guards for protection and a few other personal touches) Otherwise its stock.

Tire Wheel Cloud Sky Vehicle


The little CRF is a great dual sport.
On the street, its definitely not fast, but surprisingly plush and street riding it, is only to get it to/from the trails, or linking a few trails together (street riding, the Valk is FAR better)
Off-road, its a blast! It feels and handles like its 1/3 the weight of the Tenere 700,
Compared to the Valk it literally feels like a mountain bike with an engine
Its very agreeable, friendly, and easy to ride (which makes for a far more enjoyable confidence inspiring ride in the dirt.)

I'd recommend trying a dual sport if you've ever fancied one. They're a hoot, and make a great 2nd bike in the garage.

Tazmool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
Hello Everyone,

I've been thinking about a dual sport for quite some time.
Last year I had a chance to swing a leg over a friend's WR250R, took it out on a short-ish ride, jammed it into some weeds, climbed a few ditches, rode it on the street and I was instantly thinking: Yep... I'd like one of these.

Additionally, this was before I had my Valkyrie, and my only bike at the time was a Yamaha Tenere 700, which I did off-road a bit.
After riding the WRR, I knew instantly that the Tenere was going to go to a new owner and I was ready to move on.

I knew I wanted something different for road riding (Tenere700 to Valkyrie or VMax) and for dirt and trail riding (Tenere700 to WRR/DualSport of some kind)

I'm not saying the WRR or Valkyrie are better than the T7, but for me, they made more sense.
The T7 off road is great for an accomplished off-road rider, Check out: Pol Tarres the seeker, Tenere 700
But for me, its brutally heavy for a dirt bike (I weighed mine at 450lbs) its tall, wide, felt incredibly intimidating on the dirt, and on the street, I was just not enjoying the T7 all that much. So I got my Valk for street riding, and never looked back.

Fast forward some months, searching for dual sports (wrr on top of my list), and almost as a fluke a CRF300L popped up very close to me.
Its about a year old, priced well (cheaper than a 10 year old WRR) but needed a bit of work (it sat a for almost a year, and needed a few parts to make it the way I wanted it for me, front & rear springs as its way under-sprung, skid plate, hand guards for protection and a few other personal touches) Otherwise its stock.

View attachment 13571

The little CRF is a great dual sport.
On the street, its definitely not fast, but surprisingly plush and street riding it, is only to get it to/from the trails, or linking a few trails together (street riding, the Valk is FAR better)
Off-road, its a blast! It feels and handles like its 1/3 the weight of the Tenere 700,
Compared to the Valk it literally feels like a mountain bike with an engine
Its very agreeable, friendly, and easy to ride (which makes for a far more enjoyable confidence inspiring ride in the dirt.)

I'd recommend trying a dual sport if you've ever fancied one. They're a hoot, and make a great 2nd bike in the garage.

Tazmool
Awesome bike. Two bikes makes sense. I was looking at the Super Tenere 1200 recently to try to accommodate the best of both worlds, when I was recently selling my Valkyrie. I don't think one bike can do both well. Two bikes may be my answer as well. Congratulations on a nice bike. Is that pic in Canada?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, that photo is in Canada, taken just a few days ago, its near a small river (southwestern Ontario) and I was playing around doing little hill climbs and generally just testing out the bike.
It has rained a lot in my area, and that was the only spot I could put down the side stand and take a quick snap of the bike with out it falling over immediately. I did ride a few trails earlier that ride, and it was fun. (I'm currently on the hunt for some more protective riding gear appropriate for a dual sport)

I've ridden the Tenere 1200 on multiple occasions, its a great bike actually, I liked it when I rode it and was looking for something like that. (it was a Yamaha test day, rode the FJR1300ES, Super Tenere ES, FJ09 etc)

The Super Tenene is a great ADV Touring bike, and very much an undeserved underdog, but mainly because its a bike that is honest with itself, and a potential buyer would have to be honest with themselves as to what they need and want.
This review nails it pretty well: 24 Hours on the Super Tenere
I personally think the S10 is a great touring bike that could take you on fire roads, gravel/dirt roads, be reliable enough to go around the world etc. I bet it would shine riding from Florida to Alaska and back.

But if you really take it off-road, you'd better be quite skilled and experienced (and this is where the honesty with yourself has to come in)

I've owned a VFR1200XDA, and a Tenere 700. The VFR was 635lbs wet, good adv Tourer, tall, and top heavy. I dropped it twice, and literally pulled muscles picking it up (and yes, I did use the heavy bike lifting technique) The Tenere 700 is FAR lighter and more capable, but I'm just not that skilled, nor do I want to ride 1000 miles from home and tour around on single tracks with it, so I don't need it.
I have come to the conclusion that more than one bike, if you can do it, will fill a wider variety of wants.

Tazmool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
Awesome bike. Two bikes makes sense. I was looking at the Super Tenere 1200 recently to try to accommodate the best of both worlds, when I was recently selling my Valkyrie. I don't think one bike can do both well. Two bikes may be my answer as well. Congratulations on a nice bike. Is that pic in Canada?
The 1200 is huge across the bags for off road. It looks frickin heavy too.

I rode a KLR for 35,000 miles mainly forest roads and some single track. Sold it because I kept falling off - when stationary - it's tall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
From a few years ago.

Sometimes I'm such a dumbass.​





The northerly ride up Nimblewill Gap was much longer than I thought it would be. After a couple of miles I anticipated seeing the top of the mountain around every bend. It took about another mile before I did reach the forest road summit.

Please remember that I'm a gentleman putterer so my top speed coming up the road was about 20 mph and generally was about 10mph so that I could minimize the chance of getting a flat, KLR's run tubed tires.

There's a plaque at the summit of the road commemorating an aircraft crash that happened in 1968.

There's also a view of the downhill section of the forest road leading northwards. We've had a lot of rain recently in north Georgia and it seemed that most of the run off was going down the north side of the mountain, the direction I'm headed. As soon as the descent started the forest road showed signs of water erosion so I walked down to take a look at the lie of the land.

Hmmmm if I keep right to start with and then cross the very shallow gully in the middle I can then make my way down hugging the left side of the dirt road and keep away from the drop off down the side of the mountain.

KLR fired up I start threading my way downhill. Well that was easy, now I can press on and make my way to Two Wheels Only for lunch. Rounding the first downhill bend I see that the track is still washed out and now there are few rocks sticking through the dirt. Remember I mentioned it had been raining, well rocks on the north side of a mountain tend to “grow” a slippery covering of a variety of lichens and moss. Here we had some fine examples that anyone studying lichenometry would be happy to see. However rubber tires and green slimy, slippery rocks are not happy bedfellows so with a mental girding of loins I start down the obstacle course slowly weaving my way around the green bulges.

Around the next corner I see that the erosion is even more severe and that the center of the track is not suitable for my level of off-road skills so I have to choose the right or left and I can only see about 20 yards before the track disappears around another bend. Well I'll keep to the left away from the drop off and I'll be safe.

Hah! As I round the bend the gully in the center of the track veers sharply left due to an outcrop of rock on the right. This leaves a strip of wet, clayey soil about 12 inches wide with mature young saplings to the left of that. These saplings have whippy leaf covered branches sticking out into the 12 inch safety zone. Now I know that on dry flat blacktop I can ride a 12 inch strip in a perfectly straight line with my eyes closed and one hand behind my back. But on this soil with thin branches whipping at my face and a rear wheel waiting to slide 3 feet down into the gully?

Oh, did I forget to mention that the water erosion was doing its best to make north Georgia's own version of the Grand Canyon. What had started out as a shallow depression in the center of the track was now a 3 feet deep gash zig zagging across the side of the mountain.

There's no room to put the bike on the side stand. There's no room to turn around and go back uphill.

Dismounting from a KLR involves hopping backwards on the right foot whilst sliding the left leg across the saddle until the left foot is clear. Hah! Hopping backwards into the abyss is what I don't want to do. Leaning the bike towards the trees I gingerly get off trying to make sure I don't slip into the waiting maw of the crevasse behind me.

Success. Now all I need to do is start the bike up and using gravity and a little engine power carefully make my way about 10 feet until the strip I'm stranded on widens out. I've decided that if I start to slip into the gully I will push the bike away from me into the trees because I don't want it falling on top of me as I lay in the bottom of the gully. Hopefully the bike wont bounce back off any pliant saplings and smoosh me into the red Georgia clay.

Phew, secure footing and I can get get back on board and prepare for the next obstacle.

Did I mention that we've had a lot of rain. The Forest Service buries 15 inch diameter corrugated pipes across the tracks to allow water run off a safe passage without washing away the track. Well the recent rains we've had have exposed the upper halves of these pipes. These pipes are slippery and you may remember that rubber tires and slippery don't like to go hand in hand. The gully is now on the left of the track which means I have to get over the large corrugated slippery pipes on the right side of the track. That's the side next to the steep downhill, falling off the mountain side part of the track. I hazard a guess that if I just roll over the pipe I will hit the bottom of the bike and possibly crack the engine case so I'm going to have to “hop” the rear wheel over. OK front wheel up and on top of the large slippery metal corrugated pipe. A quick handful of throttle and up and over I go. Bloody hell, I made it.

Now the rocks that are sticking out of the tracks surface are large enough that some kind soul has spray painted the jagged tips with white paint so that the unwary traveler doesn't impale themselves on one. The gully in the track has become fractured with many off shoots and the track now looks like a rock debris field rather than anything a motorized vehicle could traverse.

Once more I'm forced to ride on the drop off side of the track and I'm thankful for the many hours of slow riding practice I've done over the years because clutch, throttle and rear brake are being manipulated very, very carefully. Gravity helps me trickle oh so slowly downhill. Forward motion is good.

A mantra flows through my head, right foot, back brake, no front brake; right foot, back brake, no front brake; right foot, back brake, no front brake.

Sweat is dripping down my back and oozing from the lining of my helmet – my spare helmet that has a removable liner.

Don't look where you don't want to go. Look where you want to go.

Don't look where you don't want to go. Look where you want to go.

Don't look where you don't want to go. Look where you want to go.

Don't look where you don't want to go. Look where you want to go.

This keeps me from falling off the side of the mountain which is good. Visions of me lying with broken limbs and possums sucking my eyes out at midnight flicker across my brain.

Another 15 yards and I'm back on a relatively smooth surface, one that looks like a rock quarry floor after the explosives have gone BOOM!

More blood, swear and tears and I arrive at the base of the mountain and on to a smooth gravel road.

On to Two Wheels Only Motorcycle Resort and Campground for lunch.


Arriving there I talk with two other dual sport riders and tell them of my morning adventure. One asks why the hell I was riding that side of Nimblewill Gap by myself.

I reply “Sometimes I'm such a dumbass.”.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top