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I am considering adding an accessory fuse block under the seat to add a layer of protection for the bike's electrical system. With all the trinkets and toys I am looking to add, I think it might keep the wiring a bit more organized as well. Has anyone done this and is there a fuse block that "fits" well?
 

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If i remember correctly i tied into the accessory wire under the seat where the Honda 12 volt accessory socket would normally plug into which is only on with ignition.However This is a british bike which i have found does have slightly different wiring or lack of it to the US bikes.
 

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I’ve used this one on multiple bikes.. I believe you get 6 switched and 2 always on - individually fused ports.. Super quality build..

Eastern Beaver PC-8.
 

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Hey Hot Rod- do you have a preference between the two? I’m about to order another PC-8 but had not seen that Centech previously..
 

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Hey Hot Rod- do you have a preference between the two? I’m about to order another PC-8 but had not seen that Centech previously..
Had the centech on a 1300VTX mounted behind side cover on the tool door. I never had any problems the 10 years it was there. It had a high quality circuit board ,stainless cover & fuses could be changed without removing cover. The Pc8 is currently mounted under my KLR650 seat bolted to the fender. More splash resistant,high quality circuit board, been under there about five years also no problems. Both need to be wired with a relay kit IMHO . The PC-8 may just have the edge due to the solid back if that is a concern ....... If memory serves correct the AP-2 may be just a tad heavier built .........Here is a quote from an on line comparison :

The PC8 is a nice unit but there's nothing magic about it compared to Centech's AP-2 if you can work with the slightly fewer number of switched fuses (PC8=6 fuses, 6 output terminals, AP-2=3 fuses, 5 output terminals) and unswitched (PC8=2 fuses, two output terminals; AP-2=2 fuses, 3 output terminals). With a little planning you figure which circuits use shared fuses on the AP-2 just like the OEM fuses are shared by many components.

The AP-2 leaves the top of the fuses exposed but the wiring chases protected so it's possible to visually see if one is blown (and replace it) without needing a screwdriver to remove a cover like on the PC8.

Market choice is a great thing.
 
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