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That’s the price of admission when you want to ride the big boy.
I don’t think those prices are bad
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope, that’s right, if you wanna stay with the engineering specs, that’s the lowest price, no one else makes things about this bike, i wanted to change my exhausted pipes because they were to quit, i called E.U , A.U , U.S No one makes them, i ended up fabricated my own pipes. Now it makes noise like a super car and i am happy with.
 

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I have used this brand on my Honda ST1300 and 1500 Valkyrie for many tens of thousands of miles.

 

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Well, I picked up the bike with the new Bridgestone Battlecruiser H50 tires on it the night before last. It was raining on the way home and I was taking it easy since they are new and probably coated with silicone but they seemed to do well in the rain. Yesterday I was able to put 150 miles on them. I took them over some really challenging roads here in the Western Carolina mountains. The Blue Ridge parkway, The Rattler (209), and The Tail of the Dragon (US129).
I am absolutely thrilled and very impressed with the New Bridgestone Battlecruiser H50 tires on my 2014 Valkyrie. They have transformed the way this bike rides and handles. Much improved over the Metzler 880's that were on the bike. The ride is much more controlled and less twitchy. Side to side transition going around corners is much smoother and easier than with the 880's and it seems to hold the line through the corners at both high and low speed with much more ease and confidence. High speed stability is greatly inproved. I have Bridgestones on my Goldwing F6B (they are the factory recommended tire). I have had a lot of different tires on that bike, Dunlop Elite (3 and 4), and others and I keep going back to the Bridgestones, they are great value for the money.
The mechanic that installed the new Bridgestones on the Valkyrie was worried that the 60 aspect sidewall verses the 55 would be too tall and would be too close to the front of the swing arm but after riding hard yesterday and with the tire temps close to 100 degrees ( I have FOBO 2 sensors on the Valkyrie) there was still almost 3/4 inch between the tire and front of the swing arm.
In conclusion, I would recommend the Bridgestones for your Valkyrie. I will report back as to how they hold up mileage wise and as I spend more time in the rain. We are here in the mountains till November and I average about 500 miles a week on this bike so I should know by the end of fall how they hold up.
UPDATE!!!
I now have 7000 miles on the Bridgestones and they are holding up well and I am still pleased with them.
 

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UPDATE!!!
I now have 7000 miles on the Bridgestones and they are holding up well and I am still pleased with them.
Good to hear. Nice to have some input on alternative tires. And you had a very enjoyable break-in, apparently!

About the FOBO 2 TPMS... I have been looking at TPMS systems and don't know one from another. It seems these are a tad more expensive than other brands and options. What is your experience with them? Are they accurate? Is the app user-friendly? How do you charge the sensors? And, do the sensors ever leak air since they must depress the valve core to sense pressure levels? Appreciate any input here.

Richmonder
 

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You got away easy. My tires alone were $550. Michelin Commander 3s. Didn't help I was stranded with a flat and couldn't shop but apparently that's the price. Just tires...
 

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Good to hear. Nice to have some input on alternative tires. And you had a very enjoyable break-in, apparently!

About the FOBO 2 TPMS... I have been looking at TPMS systems and don't know one from another. It seems these are a tad more expensive than other brands and options. What is your experience with them? Are they accurate? Is the app user-friendly? How do you charge the sensors? And, do the sensors ever leak air since they must depress the valve core to sense pressure levels? Appreciate any input here.

Richmonder
I have the FOBO on both my bikes, the Valkyrie and the F6B. I have had them for about 4 years. I have never had one leak as the sensor top and bottom have an o ring that seals really well. I put about 10k miles on each of the bikes a year and have never had any problems with them. I have changed the batteries (2032 watch batteries available everywhere) once a year. The app does give you a voltage readout on the batteries for each sensor which is nice. To change the batteries you remove the sensor and unscrew the 2 halfs, slide out the old battery, install the new one and put it back together and back on the valve stem.
They are very accurate. It does take a few seconds to reset the readout when you add or remove air and it has been amazing to see how much temperatures both inside and outside the tire vary the tire pressures. Each sensor gives an inside temperature on the readout too. I would suggest that you get a 3 way "T" valve for each tire and have them installed when you change your tires next time. That way you can leave the monitor attached and add air without having to remove the sensor. I have Corbin bags on my Valkyie and the F6B has bags too. It was a pain to crawl up under there to check the tires so these sensors really make life easier keep track of what is going on with your tires. They were expensive but there were not many other comparable units available 4 years ago and I had a number of friends who recommended them to me. I am very safety minded and tires and pressures are one of the most important things you can monitor to keep you and your bike out of trouble.
The app is not too hard to figure out. There are lots of things it will do including setting off an alarm on your phone that will go off if the tires go over or under whatever pressures you preset.
I have been very happy with them and other than hitting the button on the app to check pressures before I ride and changing the batteries once a year I never have to think about them.
I hope this is helpful and answers all of your questions.
 

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I have the FOBO on both my bikes, the Valkyrie and the F6B. I have had them for about 4 years. I have never had one leak as the sensor top and bottom have an o ring that seals really well. I put about 10k miles on each of the bikes a year and have never had any problems with them. I have changed the batteries (2032 watch batteries available everywhere) once a year. The app does give you a voltage readout on the batteries for each sensor which is nice. To change the batteries you remove the sensor and unscrew the 2 halfs, slide out the old battery, install the new one and put it back together and back on the valve stem.
They are very accurate. It does take a few seconds to reset the readout when you add or remove air and it has been amazing to see how much temperatures both inside and outside the tire vary the tire pressures. Each sensor gives an inside temperature on the readout too. I would suggest that you get a 3 way "T" valve for each tire and have them installed when you change your tires next time. That way you can leave the monitor attached and add air without having to remove the sensor. I have Corbin bags on my Valkyie and the F6B has bags too. It was a pain to crawl up under there to check the tires so these sensors really make life easier keep track of what is going on with your tires. They were expensive but there were not many other comparable units available 4 years ago and I had a number of friends who recommended them to me. I am very safety minded and tires and pressures are one of the most important things you can monitor to keep you and your bike out of trouble.
The app is not too hard to figure out. There are lots of things it will do including setting off an alarm on your phone that will go off if the tires go over or under whatever pressures you preset.
I have been very happy with them and other than hitting the button on the app to check pressures before I ride and changing the batteries once a year I never have to think about them.
I hope this is helpful and answers all of your questions.
Awesome! Thanks greatly for the info. So if you have to add air, do you just unscrew the sensor, add the air and put the sensor back on? Also, I can see where the lock nut would be valuable for anti-theft, but also a total hassle of all you want to do is be able to unscrew and screw them back on for purposes of battery changing and air filling. I'm thinking I'd probably do without since most people won't even notice the sensors and wouldn't know what to do with them if they did.

Richmonder
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I don’t understand how in the world all you conspiracy theorist go install all those other non OEM non engineering recommended tires “especially tires” i did a research because i was looking for a better brand for the 2015 Valkyrie
and the only ones that are engineered and recommended, are the OEM from honda For my bike those are the best on the engineering standards and are no better once on the market currently but honda oem tires.
however i see some wrack-less people without a second question or engineering degree installing and recommend to others some totally deferent tires or accessories that are absolutely not made for the bike but just because they think they are right !!!!!!!!!!!!, they did it !!!!!!!!!! “crazy”.

any one that can explain the craziness behind this,,,,,

how come that someone goes installs total different size total different standards from what the manufacturer says or makes, and no other manufacturers produce anything for the particular bikes, like with what type of brain. and then goes publicly and says oh oh oh i did it and it is great !!!!!! Like Jesus what the f are you saying, what the f are you thinking, why would recommend to people to go the wrong way knowing it, like seriously!!!!!!!!!!.

I’d say hey everyone no other manufacturers fit or exceed the engineering standards For this bike best is you purchase OEM Honda and not some after market junk.

Ive researched every single tire manufacturers if they fit the standards of eom of Honda for the bike and non of them did not even near it, when it came i question the specs especially for tiers, all small and big names of tire makers used the sentence you should use the oem specs because they knew what i was asking. And they could not match the engineering standards.

don't do the mistake people your life is important, tires are very important for your life, if you own a golden wing, Valkyrie, purchase only OEM honda will be cheaper and 1000 times better safer then all other junk currently on the market.
 

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I share your concern if not your rhetoric. If another manufacturer produced a radial set to meet or exceed Honda specs, I would be all over it, but they don't. I have a set of Dunlops on order through my "local" Honda Powersports dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I saw this guy somewhere in the south installing a car tire on his golden wing !!!!!!. And was proud,
 

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I ordered the FOBO 2 Bike TPMS and it arrived today. After a bit of trouble getting the phone to sync with the sensors, it now sees both of them and so far I am quite pleased with the system. My tires are at perfect pressure per manual. I'll see how it goes after a few months and report back. I appreciate the information on here from anyone who mentioned them. I had never even heard of these until I joined this forum. I'm not very good about checking pressure frequently - it's such a pain even if you have a compressor. I don't like rotating tires into place and getting on my hands and knees! This will give me a great deal of peace of mind - money well spent.

Richmonder
 

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I don't like rotating tires into place and getting on my hands and knees! This will give me a great deal of peace of mind - money well spent.
No schit. At least my Makita 18V inflator eliminates one step, I just need to hook it up and it tells me the pressure and inflates/deflates to the pressure I set. But, I'm going to check into the FOBO.
 

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I ordered the FOBO 2 Bike TPMS and it arrived today. After a bit of trouble getting the phone to sync with the sensors, it now sees both of them and so far I am quite pleased with the system. My tires are at perfect pressure per manual. I'll see how it goes after a few months and report back. I appreciate the information on here from anyone who mentioned them. I had never even heard of these until I joined this forum. I'm not very good about checking pressure frequently - it's such a pain even if you have a compressor. I don't like rotating tires into place and getting on my hands and knees! This will give me a great deal of peace of mind - money well spent.

Richmonder
Now that you have them you understand why I said to order the "T" valve for the next time you change your tire. It makes it easy to add or remove pressure without having to unscrew the sensor and deal with a small amount of pressure loss and you never have to "unlock" the nut.
I am OCD so I am always playing with the pressure to make it exactly what it is supposed to be. It has been amazing to see how quickly outside air temps and altitude affects tire pressures.
 

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I order the FOBO 2 on Tuesday, it arrived on Wednesday and got installed today. It took maybe five tries on the front tire and probably 25 tries on the rear. But it's done and the pressures are consistent with the readings on my Makita 18v tire inflator.

The kit came with two pressure monitor caps, four plastic locknuts, two spare button batteries, two unusual wrenches, an unusual key chain, and best of all two metal valve stems. Since I have a set of tires on order, the stems will be put to good use shortly.

BobR24: What is the "3 way "T" valve" you mentioned? I may not be understanding the T-valve stem rationale but you still need to take off a valve cap with a single valve stem or with the T-valve stem. When I removed the FOBO to add some air I did not have to re-pair the monitor with my phone so, what is the value of the T-valve stem? I guess if you used the plastic locknuts there would be some value in the t-valve stem and save the O-ring on the FOBO.

When using the T-valve stem your wheel might take considerably more weight to balance. Maybe a good excuse for Ride-On Tire Balancer & Sealant.
 

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I order the FOBO 2 on Tuesday, it arrived on Wednesday and got installed today. It took maybe five tries on the front tire and probably 25 tries on the rear. But it's done and the pressures are consistent with the readings on my Makita 18v tire inflator.

The kit came with two pressure monitor caps, four plastic locknuts, two spare button batteries, two unusual wrenches, an unusual key chain, and best of all two metal stems. Since I have a set of tires on order, the stems will be put to good use shortly.
I'm taking my chances without the lock nuts. I figure if I have to add air, I don't want to have to fool with those - just want to unscrew the caps and do it. Since they're worthless to anyone who may steal them (the system is mated to your phone until you release it), I figure anyone who would want them probebly already knows they can't use them. But there's always those who will do it just because. Glad to see I'm not the only one who had problems with the phone sync process. I ultimately removed one of the installed batteries and put in one of the spares. Now I think maybe it was just finicky. Keep that wrench handy on the bike in case you ever have to add air. Otherwise you're stuck.

Richmonder
 

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Now that you have them you understand why I said to order the "T" valve for the next time you change your tire. It makes it easy to add or remove pressure without having to unscrew the sensor and deal with a small amount of pressure loss and you never have to "unlock" the nut.
I am OCD so I am always playing with the pressure to make it exactly what it is supposed to be. It has been amazing to see how quickly outside air temps and altitude affects tire pressures.
I get it! Good advice. I'll keep an eye out for those and buy a couple to have on hand when I change tires.

Richmonder
 
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